Tag Archives: Editor-in-chief

Ongoing Forum: Book Reviews and the Teaching of World History

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The Middle Ground Journal Ongoing Forum: Book Reviews and the Teaching of World History
Editors: Dr. Birgit Schneider and Dr. Hong-Ming Liang

This forum has two goals. It seeks, in general, to establish a platform for discussing different approaches to teaching world history, including different class formats, different course structures and content, etc. In addition, it strives to evaluate the use of book reviews as a tool for teaching and assessment. The forum is based on my teaching of HIST3029, “Transnational History: A New Approach to the Past” at the University of Hong Kong in the spring semester of 2014. My own class shall merely serve as a starting point; I would like to encourage contributors to share their experiences or ideas about these two (and other related) aspects of teaching. This can include (and is not limited to) different contents, methodologies, and formats of teaching in the broad context of world history. The forum is intended as a space in which the gap between teaching and research is bridged through reflection on teaching per se, and especially teaching as it relates to research and the academic discipline.

Submissions to the forum should be in one of the following formats:
– Case studies outlining specific courses and their approach to relevant topics of this forum (3000-4000 words)
– Discussions of methodology, assignments, or other teaching or assessment tools (500-1000 words)
– Comments discussing existing case studies (up to 500 words)

Case studies and longer discussions will be peer reviewed, while comments will only undergo review by the editor and be posted as is (unless irrelevant or inappropriate).
The Middle Ground Journal is an open-access, refereed journal of world history and global studies housed at The College of St. Scholastica and published by the Midwest World History Association (MWWHA). We do not charge fees any type to our authors, readers and reviewers. Additional information on the journal is available at: https://www.facebook.com/middlegroundjournal  and at: http://www2.css.edu/app/depts/HIS/historyjournal/index.cfm

General inquiries on the journal should be sent to Professor Hong-Ming Liang, Chief Editor, HLIANG@CSS.EDU

Forum Introduction – Professor Birgit Schneider, Ph.D. Schneider IntroForumSpring2015themiddlegroundjournal.org
Book Review: Fatal Misconception: The Struggle to Control World Population – Matthew Connelly SchneiderConnellyForumSpring2015themiddlegroundjournal.org
Book Review: Melancholy Order – Joo Hun Han SchneiderHanForumSpring2015themiddlegroundjournal.org
Book Review: Salt: a world history – Hu Ke SchneiderHuForumSpring2015themiddlegroundjournal.org
Book Review: The Europeanization of the World – William Edward Wilson SchneiderWilsonForumSpring2015themiddlegroundjournal.org
First Reflective Essay – Class Schneider First ReflectionForumSpring2015themiddlegroundjournal.org
Second Reflective Essay – Class SchneiderSecondReflectionForumSpring2015themiddlegroundjournal.org

(c) 2015 The Middle Ground Journal, Number 10, Spring, 2015. http://TheMiddleGroundJournal.org See Submission Guidelines page for the journal’s not-for-profit educational open-access policy.

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Review of Crafting Mexico: Intellectuals, Artisans, and the State after the Revolution by Rick A. Lopez

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Review of Crafting Mexico: Intellectuals, Artisans, and the State after the Revolution by Rick A. Lopez

Crafting Mexico: Intellectuals, Artisans, and the State after the Revolution. Rick A. López. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2010. ISBN: 9780822346944

MarakCraftingReviewsSpring2015themiddlegroundjournal.org

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Review of Routledge Handbook of Japanese Culture and Society Edited by Victoria Lyon Bestor, Theodore C. Bestor, and Akiko Yamagata

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Review of Routledge Handbook of Japanese Culture and Society Edited by Victoria Lyon Bestor, Theodore C. Bestor, and Akiko Yamagata

BennettRoutledgeHandbookReviewsSpring2015themiddlegroundjournal.org

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Review of Racism without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in America by Eduardo Bonilla-Silva

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Review of Racism without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in America by Eduardo Bonilla-Silva

PanRacismReviewsSpring2015themiddlegroundjournal.org

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Review of The Oxford Handbook of Iranian History by Touraj Daryaee

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Review of The Oxford Handbook of Iranian History by Touraj Daryaee

KamolaIranReviewsSpring2015themiddlegroundjournal.org

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Review of The Imperial Map: Cartography and the Mastery of Empire Edited by James R. Akerman

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Review of The Imperial Map: Cartography and the Mastery of Empire Edited by James R. Akerman

JorgensenImperialMapReviewsSpring2015themiddlegroundjournal.org

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World History Connected Volume 12, Number 1, February 2015 issue now available

From Professor Marc Gilbert: Announcing — World History Connected Volume 12, Number 1, February 2015 issue now available

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The confluence of commemorations of the Civil War, the First and Second World Wars, and the Vietnam War is a reminder of the significance of the military in world history. Fortunately, the growth of world history over the past 30 years runs parallel to the expansion of military in terms of methodology and scope of interest. The February 2015 issue of World History Connected offers evidence of the richness of scholarship and teaching that is the result of these mutual developments. Its February Forum section throws fresh light on the role of the military in Mongol, Ottoman and Trans-Atlantic Empires and upends the assumption that the victors always those who shape the history of wars.

The Forum is followed by further articles of value in terms of both scholarship and teaching methodology. Sharika Crawford demonstrates that the role Africa and African soldiers of the British and French Empires during the Second World War are a means to incorporate Africa and Africans into the modern world history course that goes beyond the Scramble for Africa. She also argues that by identifying African wartime experiences in classroom coverage of the Second World War serves to raise subsequent questions regarding African ex-servicemens’ postwar experiences and whether these veterans affected nationalist movements in the 1950s and 1960s. Howard Spodek shows how student efforts to collect oral history interviews, especially from those who have experienced displace by war, are a superior means of “Doing World History.” John Maunu supplies an annotated digital resource for examining writing on military affairs from ancient times to 1450, which is but the first of several such resources that will appear in World History Connected in the coming years.

In the near future, issues of World History Connected will continue to explore dimensions of human conflict, such as the First and Second World Wars, but also address more pacific themes, including religious conversion, port cities, and the place of food in world history.

World History Connected welcomes the submission of articles and reviews on these and any other subject that can advance research and teaching in the still evolving field of world history.

Table of Contents

FORUM: The Military in World History

Introduction to the Forum on the Military in World History
Guest Editor: Douglas Streusand
Command of the Coast: The Mughal Navy and Regional Strategy
by Andrew De La Garza

The Falsest of Truisms: Who Writes History
by Richard L. DiNardo

The Transformational War: A New Understanding of the Ottoman Empire’s Long World War I
by James N. Tallon

The Chinggis Exchange: the Mongol Empire and Global Impact on Warfare
by Timothy May

Currents of Transatlantic Warfare: The European Revolutions and Martial Culture in Mexico, 1848-1867
by E. Mark Moreno
Articles
Beyond the Scramble: African Veterans, the Second World War and Decolonization in the World History Classroom
by Sharika Crawford

Ethnography meets History: The Personal Interview as a “Doing World History” Pedagogy, with Four Model Student Papers
by Howard Spodek

The Military and War in World History: A Digital Resource, Part I to 1450
by John Maunu
Book Reviews
Brian Thomas Swimme and Mary Evelyn Tucker, Journey of the Universe
Roger R. Briggs, Journey to Civilization: The Science of How We Got Here
by Terry D. Goddard

Partha Mitter, Much Maligned Monsters: A History of European Reactions to Indian Art
by Bethe Hagens

Stephen Morillo, Frameworks of World History: Networks, Hierarchies, Culture
by Aiqun Hu

Caroline Elkins and Susan Peterson (eds.) Settler Colonialism in the Twentieth Century
Christopher Lloyd, Jacob Metzer, and Richard Sutch (eds.), Settler Economies in World History
Lionel Pilkington and Fiona Bateman (eds.) Studies in Settler Colonialism: Politics, Identity, and Culture
by Tom Laichas

Mary Jo Maynes and Ann Waltner. 2012. The Family: A World History
by Farid Pazhoohi

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