Tag Archives: Articles

British Children’s Literature on Crimean War: Alfred Henty’s Jack Archer: History of Crimea

British Children’s Literature on Crimean War: Alfred Henty’s Jack Archer: History of Crimea

This essay is a part of our series, Literature and the World

In this article the author analyses G. A. Henty’s Jack Archer: History of Crimea (1883) not only as one of the few British novels directly using the ‘Crimean’ storyline, but as a novel for children that inherited the tradition of British Bildungsroman and appeared to be a new stage in development of this genre in British literature.

Key words: British literature, A.G.Henty, Bidungsroman, Crimean War.

SaranaCrimeanArticlesSpring2016themiddlegroundjournal.org

Edited by Jill Gaeta and Teresa Kent Todd

(c) 2016 The Middle Ground Journal, Number 12, Spring, 2016. http://TheMiddleGroundJournal.org See Submission Guidelines page for the journal’s not-for-profit educational open-access policy.

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Child Soldiers Revisited: Conscription and Choice in Ken Saro-Wiwa’s Sozaboy and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Half of a Yellow Sun

Child Soldiers Revisited: Conscription and Choice in Ken Saro-Wiwa’s Sozaboy and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Half of a Yellow Sun

This essay is a part of our series, Literature and the World

Child soldier peripheralization in the Global South is explored though the narrative devices of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Half of a Yellow Sun and Ken Saro-Wiwa’s Sozaboy. I intend to reconnoiter the susceptibilities of children in combat with their resilience, agency, and critical accountability in war participation.

BorundaChildArticlesSpring2016themiddlegroundjournal.org

Edited by Jill Gaeta and Teresa Kent Todd

(c) 2016 The Middle Ground Journal, Number 12, Spring, 2016. http://TheMiddleGroundJournal.org See Submission Guidelines page for the journal’s not-for-profit educational open-access policy.

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Can the Child Speak? Childhood in the Age of Nation-States, Children’s Rights, and the Role of Children’s Literature

Can the Child Speak? Childhood in the Age of Nation-States, Children’s Rights, and the Role of Children’s Literature

This essay is a part of our series, Literature and the World — for more information, please see HERE.

Short Title: Can the Child Speak?

Key Words: childhood, children’s rights, children’s literature, children’s books, convention on the rights of the child, crc, united nations, heteroglossia, didacticism, dialogization

Abstract: Positing that the institutions of childhood, and children’s books in particular, contain the child as both a controlled subject and a disruptive presence, this article notes the potential of children’s literature for fostering a dialogical engagement between child and adult voices within as well as outside the texts.

NolteOdhiamboCanArticlesSpring2016themiddlegroundjournal.org

Edited by Jill Gaeta and Teresa Kent Todd

(c) 2016 The Middle Ground Journal, Number 12, Spring, 2016. http://TheMiddleGroundJournal.org See Submission Guidelines page for the journal’s not-for-profit educational open-access policy.

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Losing the “Middle Ground”: Conflict, Culture, and Civilization in the Southeastern Borderlands

Losing the “Middle Ground”: Conflict, Culture, and Civilization in the Southeastern Borderlands

This essay is a part of our series, Borders in the Classroom

On March 4, 1817, Andrew Jackson wrote a letter to President James Monroe that proposed a radical shift in the way the Federal government negotiated with Native American groups who still maintained their autonomy on the American frontier. In his experience as a soldier, governor of Tennessee, and treaty negotiator, Jackson had concluded, “The Indians are the subjects of the United States inhabiting a territory and acknowledging its sovereignty, then is it not absurd for a sovereign to negotiate by treaty with subject….” According to Jackson, the Federal government should assume a strong position and impose its will on the Native American population because “circumstances have entirely changed, and the time has come when a just course of policy can be exercised towards them- their existence and happiness now depend upon a change in their habits and customs which can only be effected by a change of policy in the Government.” The United States by 1817 had firmly established itself as the primary power of the previously contested Southeastern Borderlands along the Gulf coast. The Choctaws, the second largest Native American group along the Gulf coast, still held a strong position despite the growing power of the United States. In response to the strengthened U.S. and proposed changes of policy, the Choctaws developed and engaged in new strategies to maintain their negotiating position, political autonomy, and territorial integrity.

McKisickLosingArticlesFall2015themiddlegroundjournal.org

Edited by Andrae M. Marak

(c) 2015 The Middle Ground Journal, Number 11, Fall, 2015. http://TheMiddleGroundJournal.org See Submission Guidelines page for the journal’s not-for-profit educational open-access policy.

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